Articles Tagged ‘SEER’

Need stats? How to find the most up-to-date cancer statistics

Screen capture of http://seer.cancer.gov/csr/1975_2008/

The Cancer Statistics Review (CSR), updated just this morning with new incidence statistics, contains the most recent data available on incidence, mortality, survival, prevalence, and lifetime risk statistics for 27 cancers. Unlike other statistical cancer reports, the CSR is purely about numbers, without interpretation. The CSR is updated each year, as soon as new numbers are ready, ensuring that its figures are as up-to-date as possible. Today’s update includes data on incidence rates through 2008 (previously 2007). Mortality and lifetime risk updates for 2008 are expected in a few months.

A Quick Guide to Finding Cancer Statistics

Ductal Carcinoma In Situ, per 1000 Mammograms

To find the latest cancer statistics, consult the Cancer Statistics Review (CSR), a database published annually by the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program of the National Cancer Institute (NCI).

Understanding Cancer Statistics

Ductal Carcinoma In Situ, per 1000 Mammograms

This issue of BenchMarks offers a variety of information on cancer statistics and what they mean. The video button will bring you an archived Webcast of the National Cancer Institute’s September 2, 2003, Science Writers Seminar, “New Cancer Statistics: Making Them Relevant to Your Readers.” The seminar presents the just-released cancer statistics from the “Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975-2000″ and discusses how screening and treatment affect cancer trends and how to find state and county statistics.

BenchMarks’ main feature is an interview with Martin Brown, Ph.D., chief of NCI’s Health Services and Economics Branch. Dr. Brown measures, through surveys, how widely screening and treatment advances are used in various populations and how this use influences cancer statistics. Soundbites from the interview appear in “Audio Clips.” “Photos/Stills” depicts results from several surveillance surveys. Accompanying Dr. Brown’s interview is a primer that describes various cancer statistics and guides viewers to where they can be found. It also includes links to the latest annual report.